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Centralia woman has her own centennial!

Posted on Monday, April 1, 2019 at 6:13 am

Maxine Lincoln turns 100

During the celebration of her 100th birthday, Maxine Lincoln looks upon the face of her newest great-granddaughter, Stella Louise Williams whose parents brought her from Reno to Centralia for the celebration.

During the celebration of her 100th birthday, Maxine Lincoln looks upon the face of her newest great-granddaughter, Stella Louise Williams whose parents brought her from Reno to Centralia for the celebration.

In 1919, World War 1 ended and Centralia’s newest centenarian, Maxine Lincoln, began.

March 30, 1919 Maxine Lincoln was born to Gus and Mattie Flowers Hancock on a cotton and peanut farm outside Sylvester, Georgia.

She was the couple’s seventh child.

Maxine, the fourth girl born to a family of four girls and three boys, said she was born three months after Gus was injured in a farm accident which in those days of family driven south-Georgia share-cropping, made for tough times.

“We were a loving family,” she remembered. “When I was 15, my brother Brad sold one of his pigs to help pay for my junior college.”

While there was plenty of love, she said, it was not an easy childhood.

“We were all out in the cotton and peanut fields,” she said. One of her strongest memories of those days involved a contest with her brothers and sisters to see who could pick the most cotton and win a Hershey chocolate bar.  She said in those days, there were few things as alluring to a little share-cropper girl as a Hershey bar. ”Heck I wanted that chocolate bar,” Lincoln said, her China-blue eyes peering back into a distant decade. She said she did not win the chocolate and there was nothing so hot as being covered by a pile of cotton bolls during a south-Georgia summer. “It was hotter than Hades under all that cotton.”

For the complete article, see this week’s edition of the Centralia Fireside Guard.